Friday, September 23, 2005

Some Common Types Of Roses

After you get a sense of the type of roses that you would like to plant, you will naturally want to know which type of rose's best fit your ideas for planting. There are too many to list here, but I can list some of them for you. You should consult your nearest garden center for advice on whether your choice is fitting to your garden's abilities.

Landscape roses Landscape roses are great for the novice gardener. They are disease resistant, and require a little bit less maintenance. Hybrid teas are not good for the novice.

Climbing Roses These roses are different from the regular roses that are planted as they are trained to grow upward like vines. Most people like to use these for trellises, or buildings. Some of them are hybrid teas, wichuraine, and large flowered climbers. They are a beautiful addition to the look of one's house.

Shrub Roses Shrub roses like the beautiful rugosa are both long blooming, and disease resistant. These are also great for the novice planter. They are gorgeous even when they are not in bloom because the foliage is so pretty.

Old Garden Roses These roses are not very good for those with severe allergies to strong fragrances because they have a strong fragrant odor. However, they are disease resistant and continue to bloom for months at a time.

The Modern Rose These are very special roses because they are the result of cross breeding the hybrid tea with the polyanthus. They are also referred to as Floribunda. They are a beautiful combination of the best those two flowers have to offer. They are long blooming, fragrant, and they are great for cutting.

Miniature Roses Miniature roses are exactly what they sound like. They have all of the fragrance and beauty of a regular rose, but they have smaller blooms. These particular roses are great for indoor planting.


Gordon Goh is the webmaster for http://www.simplyflowergarden.info offering Rose Garden Tips

Tuesday, September 20, 2005

Wedding Flowers – Decorations With Style!

When we think of wedding flowers we often think of the bride’s bouquet, but flowers can be wonderful accessories in almost any surroundings. Using wedding flowers as decorations is popular, particularly for a summer wedding. Wedding flowers also provide a wonderful fresh scent that will last throughout the day.

Wedding Flowers and The Ceremony

The main role for wedding flowers, during the ceremony, is as part of the bridal party bouquets. However, look a little further and you will see a whole host of opportunities for you wedding flowers.

Why not use a bow of material with one pretty flower in the center, on the back of every chair. Simple yet effective. Wedding flowers can also be used as part of the ceremony venue decorations. It may be possible, for example, to line the aisle with flowers or to ask a bridesmaid to scatter petals on the path, in front of the bride.

Wedding Flowers and the Reception

Wedding flowers are not traditionally part of the reception decorations. But, there is no reason why flowers cannot be a fundamental part of your decorative design. Flowers can be used as center pieces on the tables, they can even be used as a fun way of telling people at which table they should be sitting. For example, you could have a rose table, a lily table and a violet table.

Instead of favors, it could be a great idea to use wedding flowers such as a single rose as gift for every woman. Wedding flowers can also be used to decorate the venue itself, for example, as part of the room decorations - a fresh and vibrant alternative to balloons!

Wedding Flowers as Gifts

It is traditional to give gifts to those who have helped with the wedding arrangements, such as the mother of the bride, bridesmaids and mother of the groom. Why not combine any other gift you have chosen with some wedding flowers. As you will be ordering in bulk, the cost of a few bouquets will be much less than you originally thought, so ask your florist what they can do for you.

Wedding flowers are often thrown away at the end of the day; try to think ahead as to what you can do with all the displays that you have purchased, after the event. As most couples head straight off on honeymoon, they are unlikely to be able to make the most of the wedding flowers, so have some friends in mind that may appreciate the displays.

If you want to preserve your wedding flowers, why not get them dried or pressed flowers? Alternatively, you could consider planting the flowers or even having more long-living specimens such as decorative cacti.

When it comes to wedding flowers, there truly is no limit to your imagination!

Elsie Gilbert offers great insights to all different types of wedding ceremonies, wedding styles, wedding accessories. From traditional to the exotic she makes it easy for the bride and groom to review and choose. For more details on all types of wedding ideas visit this site now www.weddingceremonyhelp.com

This article is specially selected by Gordon Goh, owner of http://www.simplyflowergarden.info
and http://gardentip.50webs.com

Monday, September 19, 2005

Build a Rain Garden

Get this free credit card after you have tried all credit cards in the markets.

Build a Rain Garden

There's a new garden in town. It is (mostly) easy to install, looks good year-round, requires almost no maintenance and has a terrifically upbeat impact on the environment. No wonder rain gardens are such a great new gardening trend!

Storm water runoff can be a big problem in summer during heavy thunderstorms. As the water rushes across roofs and driveways, it picks up oil and other pollutants. Municipal storm water treatment plants often can’t handle the deluge of water, and in many locations the untreated water ends up in natural waterways. The EPA estimates as much as 70 percent of the pollution in our streams, rivers, and lakes is carried there by storm water! By taking responsibility for the rainwater that falls on your own roof and driveway, you'll be helping to protect our rivers, streams and lakes from stormwater pollution.

To reduce the excess water runoff, many towns are encouraging businesses and homeowners to install rain gardens in their yards. Rain gardens are specially constructed gardens located in low areas of a yard where storm water can collect. The idea is to have the water naturally funnel to this garden. The rain garden collects water runoff and stores and filters it until it can be slowly absorbed by the soil. Rather than rushing off into a storm sewer or a local waterway, the rainwater can collect in a garden where it will be naturally filtered by plants and soil.

Installing a rain garden is easy.

You simply dig a shallow depression in your yard and plant it with native grasses and wildflowers; things that are easy to grow and maintain in your area.



What makes a garden a rain garden?
First, the garden will be designed with a low spot in the middle to collect and absorb rain water and snow melt. This depression can range from a few inches in a small garden, to an excavated trough that's several feet deep. Second, rain gardens are usually located where they'll catch the runoff from impermeable surfaces like sidewalks and driveways, or from gutters and roof valleys. Third, rain gardens are usually planted with native wildflowers and grasses that will thrive in tough growing conditions. Finally, rain gardens are designed to channel heavy rains to another rain garden or to another part of the garden.

Your rain garden should be located at least 10 feet from the house. The garden’s size and location depends on the yard. The ideal situation would be to locate the garden in a natural depression. You also can funnel water from downspouts on gutters into the garden. The soil should be well drained so the water doesn’t sit in the garden for more than two days. A special “rain garden” soil mix of 50 to 60 percent sand, 20 to 30 percent topsoil, and 20 to 30 percent compost is recommended. You can dig this mixture into the soil to depth of 2 feet before planting.

Once you've identified the new garden's location, remove the sod and dig a shallow depression approximately 6-inches deep. Slope the sides gradually from the outside edge to the deepest area. Use the soil that you remove to build up a slightly raised area on the lowest side of the garden. This berm will help contain the stormwater and allow it to percolate slowly through the rain garden.

If your rain garden is no more than about 6-inches deep, stormwater will usually be absorbed within a one- to seven-day period. Because mosquitoes require seven to 10 days to lay and hatch their eggs, this will help you avoid mosquito problems.

Your downspout or sump pump outlet should be directed toward your rain garden depression. This can be accomplished by a natural slope, by digging a shallow swale, or by piping the runoff directly to the garden through a buried 4" diameter plastic drain tile.



Plant Selection... The final touch.

The most difficult part of building a rain garden (if it can even be called that) can be plant selection. Plants need to be tough enough to withstand periodic flooding, yet attractive enough to look good in the garden. Deep-rooted, low-care native plants, such as asters, and tough non-natives, such as daylilies, are best. If properly designed, the rain garden can consist of a blend of attractive shrubs, perennials, trees, and ground covers. Planting strips of grass around the garden and using mulch also can help filter the water.

New plants should be watered every other day for the first two weeks or so. Once they are well established, your garden should thrive without additional watering. Fertilizers will not be necessary, and only minimal weeding will be needed after the first summer of growth.


Our goal at Garden Simply is to make your organic garden work sustainable; be more productive, and ultimately more fun! Jodi Reichenberger provides education about enhancing you and your family's health through good eating, organic gardening techniques, organic gardening tips, and an all around sustainable lifestyle; providing helpful organic pest control tips (Integrated Pest Managment or IPM)to help you make the most of your effort, and the lastest community gardening and sustainable gardening news out there. Join us! Sustainability is a community effort!

Article selected by Gordon Goh - get your free 101 tips for Rose Garden, and Credit Card Guide.