Friday, September 23, 2005

Some Common Types Of Roses

After you get a sense of the type of roses that you would like to plant, you will naturally want to know which type of rose's best fit your ideas for planting. There are too many to list here, but I can list some of them for you. You should consult your nearest garden center for advice on whether your choice is fitting to your garden's abilities.

Landscape roses Landscape roses are great for the novice gardener. They are disease resistant, and require a little bit less maintenance. Hybrid teas are not good for the novice.

Climbing Roses These roses are different from the regular roses that are planted as they are trained to grow upward like vines. Most people like to use these for trellises, or buildings. Some of them are hybrid teas, wichuraine, and large flowered climbers. They are a beautiful addition to the look of one's house.

Shrub Roses Shrub roses like the beautiful rugosa are both long blooming, and disease resistant. These are also great for the novice planter. They are gorgeous even when they are not in bloom because the foliage is so pretty.

Old Garden Roses These roses are not very good for those with severe allergies to strong fragrances because they have a strong fragrant odor. However, they are disease resistant and continue to bloom for months at a time.

The Modern Rose These are very special roses because they are the result of cross breeding the hybrid tea with the polyanthus. They are also referred to as Floribunda. They are a beautiful combination of the best those two flowers have to offer. They are long blooming, fragrant, and they are great for cutting.

Miniature Roses Miniature roses are exactly what they sound like. They have all of the fragrance and beauty of a regular rose, but they have smaller blooms. These particular roses are great for indoor planting.


Gordon Goh is the webmaster for http://www.simplyflowergarden.info offering Rose Garden Tips

Tuesday, September 20, 2005

Wedding Flowers – Decorations With Style!

When we think of wedding flowers we often think of the bride’s bouquet, but flowers can be wonderful accessories in almost any surroundings. Using wedding flowers as decorations is popular, particularly for a summer wedding. Wedding flowers also provide a wonderful fresh scent that will last throughout the day.

Wedding Flowers and The Ceremony

The main role for wedding flowers, during the ceremony, is as part of the bridal party bouquets. However, look a little further and you will see a whole host of opportunities for you wedding flowers.

Why not use a bow of material with one pretty flower in the center, on the back of every chair. Simple yet effective. Wedding flowers can also be used as part of the ceremony venue decorations. It may be possible, for example, to line the aisle with flowers or to ask a bridesmaid to scatter petals on the path, in front of the bride.

Wedding Flowers and the Reception

Wedding flowers are not traditionally part of the reception decorations. But, there is no reason why flowers cannot be a fundamental part of your decorative design. Flowers can be used as center pieces on the tables, they can even be used as a fun way of telling people at which table they should be sitting. For example, you could have a rose table, a lily table and a violet table.

Instead of favors, it could be a great idea to use wedding flowers such as a single rose as gift for every woman. Wedding flowers can also be used to decorate the venue itself, for example, as part of the room decorations - a fresh and vibrant alternative to balloons!

Wedding Flowers as Gifts

It is traditional to give gifts to those who have helped with the wedding arrangements, such as the mother of the bride, bridesmaids and mother of the groom. Why not combine any other gift you have chosen with some wedding flowers. As you will be ordering in bulk, the cost of a few bouquets will be much less than you originally thought, so ask your florist what they can do for you.

Wedding flowers are often thrown away at the end of the day; try to think ahead as to what you can do with all the displays that you have purchased, after the event. As most couples head straight off on honeymoon, they are unlikely to be able to make the most of the wedding flowers, so have some friends in mind that may appreciate the displays.

If you want to preserve your wedding flowers, why not get them dried or pressed flowers? Alternatively, you could consider planting the flowers or even having more long-living specimens such as decorative cacti.

When it comes to wedding flowers, there truly is no limit to your imagination!

Elsie Gilbert offers great insights to all different types of wedding ceremonies, wedding styles, wedding accessories. From traditional to the exotic she makes it easy for the bride and groom to review and choose. For more details on all types of wedding ideas visit this site now www.weddingceremonyhelp.com

This article is specially selected by Gordon Goh, owner of http://www.simplyflowergarden.info
and http://gardentip.50webs.com

Monday, September 19, 2005

Build a Rain Garden

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Build a Rain Garden

There's a new garden in town. It is (mostly) easy to install, looks good year-round, requires almost no maintenance and has a terrifically upbeat impact on the environment. No wonder rain gardens are such a great new gardening trend!

Storm water runoff can be a big problem in summer during heavy thunderstorms. As the water rushes across roofs and driveways, it picks up oil and other pollutants. Municipal storm water treatment plants often can’t handle the deluge of water, and in many locations the untreated water ends up in natural waterways. The EPA estimates as much as 70 percent of the pollution in our streams, rivers, and lakes is carried there by storm water! By taking responsibility for the rainwater that falls on your own roof and driveway, you'll be helping to protect our rivers, streams and lakes from stormwater pollution.

To reduce the excess water runoff, many towns are encouraging businesses and homeowners to install rain gardens in their yards. Rain gardens are specially constructed gardens located in low areas of a yard where storm water can collect. The idea is to have the water naturally funnel to this garden. The rain garden collects water runoff and stores and filters it until it can be slowly absorbed by the soil. Rather than rushing off into a storm sewer or a local waterway, the rainwater can collect in a garden where it will be naturally filtered by plants and soil.

Installing a rain garden is easy.

You simply dig a shallow depression in your yard and plant it with native grasses and wildflowers; things that are easy to grow and maintain in your area.



What makes a garden a rain garden?
First, the garden will be designed with a low spot in the middle to collect and absorb rain water and snow melt. This depression can range from a few inches in a small garden, to an excavated trough that's several feet deep. Second, rain gardens are usually located where they'll catch the runoff from impermeable surfaces like sidewalks and driveways, or from gutters and roof valleys. Third, rain gardens are usually planted with native wildflowers and grasses that will thrive in tough growing conditions. Finally, rain gardens are designed to channel heavy rains to another rain garden or to another part of the garden.

Your rain garden should be located at least 10 feet from the house. The garden’s size and location depends on the yard. The ideal situation would be to locate the garden in a natural depression. You also can funnel water from downspouts on gutters into the garden. The soil should be well drained so the water doesn’t sit in the garden for more than two days. A special “rain garden” soil mix of 50 to 60 percent sand, 20 to 30 percent topsoil, and 20 to 30 percent compost is recommended. You can dig this mixture into the soil to depth of 2 feet before planting.

Once you've identified the new garden's location, remove the sod and dig a shallow depression approximately 6-inches deep. Slope the sides gradually from the outside edge to the deepest area. Use the soil that you remove to build up a slightly raised area on the lowest side of the garden. This berm will help contain the stormwater and allow it to percolate slowly through the rain garden.

If your rain garden is no more than about 6-inches deep, stormwater will usually be absorbed within a one- to seven-day period. Because mosquitoes require seven to 10 days to lay and hatch their eggs, this will help you avoid mosquito problems.

Your downspout or sump pump outlet should be directed toward your rain garden depression. This can be accomplished by a natural slope, by digging a shallow swale, or by piping the runoff directly to the garden through a buried 4" diameter plastic drain tile.



Plant Selection... The final touch.

The most difficult part of building a rain garden (if it can even be called that) can be plant selection. Plants need to be tough enough to withstand periodic flooding, yet attractive enough to look good in the garden. Deep-rooted, low-care native plants, such as asters, and tough non-natives, such as daylilies, are best. If properly designed, the rain garden can consist of a blend of attractive shrubs, perennials, trees, and ground covers. Planting strips of grass around the garden and using mulch also can help filter the water.

New plants should be watered every other day for the first two weeks or so. Once they are well established, your garden should thrive without additional watering. Fertilizers will not be necessary, and only minimal weeding will be needed after the first summer of growth.


Our goal at Garden Simply is to make your organic garden work sustainable; be more productive, and ultimately more fun! Jodi Reichenberger provides education about enhancing you and your family's health through good eating, organic gardening techniques, organic gardening tips, and an all around sustainable lifestyle; providing helpful organic pest control tips (Integrated Pest Managment or IPM)to help you make the most of your effort, and the lastest community gardening and sustainable gardening news out there. Join us! Sustainability is a community effort!

Article selected by Gordon Goh - get your free 101 tips for Rose Garden, and Credit Card Guide.

Thursday, May 19, 2005

Garden Room Boundaries...

The areas of your landscape can be divided into several sections and areas, which are also known as garden rooms. Garden rooms are spaces where you plant, grow, and display different ideas in gardening in various creative methods. One garden room could be a rose garden, while another could include the use of a water garden, while still another garden room in your landscape could include the use of just purple flowers. Garden rooms are your creation, and only limited to your imagination...

Wednesday, May 18, 2005

Flower Garden Article

Featured Gardening Articles...

How to Attract Butterfly Activity...
The flittering of the butterfly through your garden is no accident if you planned your garden carefully. The adult butterfly flitters from flower to flower - sipping nectar from many flowers in your gardens, while other adult butterflies search for areas to lay their larvae. It is good to take note that the butterfly garden is going to differ from other areas of your garden. Your natural instincts will be to kill off pests, larvae and creatures in the garden, but in the butterfly garden your best results are noticed when you use organic gardening: Which means no chemicals at all...

A Bit About Bare Root Roses, plus Rose Gardening Tips
Scents from the rose garden filling the air as you walk by... it's a lovely summer scent that you can enjoy every year. Many gardeners know that the rose is referred to as the queen of all flowers, and you can see the history in the rose by traveling back in time to Europe. The rose is a plant whose scent predominates the historical gardens all over the world. Historical gardens in Europe include the use of Roses, Peonies, Honeysuckle, and a few other strongly scented plants. The rose creates the feeling of royalty, color, and elegance all in the same instant...

Monday, May 16, 2005

Growing Organic! Herbs, Flowers and Fruit

Creating no dig gardens on top of the soil gives you many immediate advantages over the usual garden.

It is quick and easy
It will improve the soil underneath the bed
It is weed free and organic

While my site has concentrated on the vegetable garden, the same garden building techniques can be used for flower beds, herbs and fruit trees.

Herbs

Herbs can be planted straight into the no dig garden bed. Because of their uses, the herb garden should be situated in a sunny spot very near your kitchen. Then you can simply step out the door and make an ordinary meal into a culinary delight! If there isn't an obvious space handy, herbs will grow very well in containers.

However, if you do have the space, there is a wonderful project called the 'Herb Spiral' you can build. It's extremely space efficient and caters for the various microclimates that herbs like.

It involves building a vertical spiral, usually from rocks, about 6 ft across and 2-3 feet high. The top is quite dry and hot, the bottom is moist and there is a sunny side and a shady side. A garden of this size will need about 1.5 cubic metres of soil or compost materials.

The top is good for Mediterranearn type herbs like rosemary, thyme and sage. The mid sections suit chives, shallots, Italian parsley, tarragon, rocket and coriander. The lower, cooler section suits borage, peppermint, pennywort and lemon balm. These are just suggestions as there are many plants that will grow in your spiral.

Useful note: For those in the Northern hemisphere, the hottest side of your spiral will be facing south. For those in the Southern hemisphere, the hottest side of your spiral will be facing north.

Flowers and Shrubs

Every garden has some sort of ornamental flowers or shrubs. It's fundamental to our concept of a garden! The no dig gardening method will allow then to thrive no matter where you are.

There isn't the space to go into specifics here, but some simple considerations before you get started...


Try to plant species that are native to your area. There are many reasons for this but the best one is that those plants will do best where you live! Don't get stuck in a high maintenance routine for something that simply isn't suited to your area.


Plant species that will attract local fauna. Help struggling native animals, birds, frogs and insects by building suitable habitat for them. You will be rewarded many times over when they discover where you live!


Plan what you want from your garden. A colour scheme? Flowering year round? What will really thrill and inspire you? That is what the garden is for. It feeds your spirit while you make your way in the world.

Fruit trees

To use the no dig garden method with fruit trees, you have to be patient. The garden will have to be 2-3 generations on before the benefits have gone deep enough for the fruit tree to be planted. However, once the hard yards are done (mostly by local worms!), you should be thinking about planting your own fruit trees.

Apples are the most popular fruit on the planet. Do you recall how the fruit tasted when you were a kid? Nothing like the stuff you get today. The disturbing thing is that pesticides can be taken into the fruit and stay there long after harvest. Then they are waxed and stored in chemical dependant environments. Seriously consider growing your own fruit.

Berry canes, apples, cherries, lemons, limes, plums, pears, oranges, there's no end to the possibilities. Explore what will grow in your neighbourhood and plant those trees! It's not too hard and a single tree (apple) can net up to 500 apples in a growing season.

Growing items of your own food is incredibly rewarding. Even decorating your house with cut flowers that you have grown yourself is vastly more satisfying than just buying a bunch. Gardening is a creative and spiritually nourishing pastime. Ponder your space. Imagine the limitless variety available to you. Then go crazy with inspiration!

Judy Williams (http://www.no-dig-vegetablegarden.com) aspires to become a fulltime earth mother goddess. This site acts as a primer for all vegetable gardening aspects covering topics like how to build a garden, nurture seedlings, container gardening and composting.

PS : completed installation of RSS Parser in the server.

Updated by Gordon Goh providing free eCourse on Learn Online Business and free Review Report on SEO Website Builder

Sunday, March 27, 2005

Light Up Your Garden And Brighten Your Life

Extending Your Living Space

The garden is fast being considered to be an extension to your living space and homeowners are putting as much effort into creating a harmonious environment outside as they are inside. A beautiful garden is also considered to be one of the biggest selling features of a home and can certainly help to add value and appeal.

As the short days of winter recede, many of us will be starting to think about our gardens and dreaming up projects and schemes that we plan to undertake when the days become longer and the weather warmer. For many traditionalists this will mean planting borders, manicuring the lawn and cultivating a myriad of blooms that will add colour and life to their gardens throughout the summer, whilst others will view their garden purely as an area in which to relax.

Garden centres are already stocked with outdoor furniture, ubiquitous decking and the eclectic range of artefacts that are designed to help you enjoy your garden to the full. However, garden lighting is one of the most effective ways that you can improve the look and functionality of your outdoor living space and increases the time that you can appreciate this natural extension to your home. Garden lighting has moved beyond the occasional wall lantern or halogen floodlight illuminating the patio or garden path, blending functionality with creativity. Strategic outdoor lighting enables you to enjoy aspects of your garden at all times of the day or evening, all year ‘round, whether for entertainment purposes or your own pleasure.

The garden at night should be considered to be a blank canvas on which one’s own creation can evolve. Properly placed lighting can create the most wonderful ambience by silhouetting trees, highlighting favourite shrubs, accenting flowerbeds or reflecting the diamond like sparkle of droplets cascading from a water feature.

The Key to Successful Creative Lighting


The key to successful lighting is to focus in on specific architectural features:

Uplight pergolas, archways or façades for a dramatic effect

“Wash” sides of buildings with a subtle light

Focus a gentle light across fences and walls

Highlight water features with submersible lights

Silhouette trees by placing lights below and behind them.


Bring your garden alive after dark by illuminating it with a range of carefully chosen coloured lights:

Add warmth with tones of yellow or red

Add a green light beneath foliage to make leaves appear greener

Create a fresher, Nordic atmosphere with white or blue light. This is particularly effective if you have a lot of pine trees.



Subtlety is the key, since a blend of too many colours can give a gaudy appearance, unless of course you have a penchant for theme park styles.

Functional Lighting

If you are seeking more functional lighting, then low voltage fittings are the best option. Uplighters fitted into decking or patios can add that subtle but necessary source of light when the sun goes down, whether you are entertaining or just relaxing. But there are always more creative possibilities. Recessed lighting can be built into steps and fixed seating or under handrails. Each source of light becomes a feature in itself and creates the individuality and atmosphere that reflects your own needs and personality.

If you are an active barbecuer and you need more direct light, then spotlights that are discretely located but focused on your cooking area are ideal. If safety and security are your concern then there is a wide range of functional but aesthetic lighting available to illuminate steps, paths and driveways and help to prevent accidents after dark. Motion detectors that activate lighting when someone passes by have proved to be a boon for added security and safety. Another way of improving security is to have certain strategically placed lighting linked to photo electric cells that automatically turn on at dusk and off at dawn.

Lighting Tips

When creating a lighting scheme for your garden you should adopt the less is more approach. The objective must always be to see the landscape and not the lights, with the right balance between aesthetic and functional lighting.

It is important always to use lights that have the correct IP rating and are therefore suitable for outdoor lighting. Although the installation of these types of light is not difficult, it is recommended that you employ a qualified electrician for their installation.

There is a wide range of products on the market from which to choose, but the most cost-effective solution is to buy the best quality you can. By choosing quality products and having them professionally fitted you’ll have something that will not only last for years, but also maintains its good looks.

Don’t forget that you are starting with a blank canvas. Like art, there are a few basic rules that you should follow, but in the end beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Be creative. Make your garden an extension to your home. A ‘room’ under the stars!

www.thelightcompanydirect.co.uk

About The Author

Carolyn and Laurence James own The Light Company Direct Ltd, an independent, family run business, based in the heart of the Cotswolds. The company offers a superb range of distinctive and stylish lighting for homes and commercial establishments via mail order and the Internet. Carolyn and Laurence have selected lighting that represents the very best in design and craftsmanship. They have developed close links with key manufacturers throughout Europe and are able to offer customers many designs that are rarely seen in the UK.

carolyn@thelightcompanydirect.co.uk